Tag Archives: Occupy Wall Street

“My Occupy LA Arrest” By Patrick Meighan, Writer On ‘Family Guy’

My Occupy LA Arrest, by Patrick Meighan

My name is Patrick Meighan, and I’m a husband, a father, a writer on the Fox animated sitcom “Family Guy”, and a member of the Unitarian Universalist Community Church of Santa Monica.

I was arrested at about 1 a.m. Wednesday morning with 291 other people at Occupy LA. I was sitting in City Hall Park with a pillow, a blanket, and a copy of Thich Nhat Hanh’s “Being Peace” when 1,400 heavily-armed LAPD officers in paramilitary SWAT gear streamed in. I was in a group of about 50 peaceful protestors who sat Indian-style, arms interlocked, around a tent (the symbolic image of the Occupy movement). The LAPD officers encircled us, weapons drawn, while we chanted “We Are Peaceful” and “We Are Nonviolent” and “Join Us.”

As we sat there, encircled, a separate team of LAPD officers used knives to slice open every personal tent in the park. They forcibly removed anyone sleeping inside, and then yanked out and destroyed any personal property inside those tents, scattering the contents across the park. They then did the same with the communal property of the Occupy LA movement. For example, I watched as the LAPD destroyed a pop-up canopy tent that, until that moment, had been serving as Occupy LA’s First Aid and Wellness tent, in which volunteer health professionals gave free medical care to absolutely anyone who requested it. As it happens, my family had personally contributed that exact canopy tent to Occupy LA, at a cost of several hundred of my family’s dollars. As I watched, the LAPD sliced that canopy tent to shreds, broke the telescoping poles into pieces and scattered the detritus across the park. Note that these were the objects described in subsequent mainstream press reports as “30 tons of garbage” that was “abandoned” by Occupy LA: personal property forcibly stolen from us, destroyed in front of our eyes and then left for maintenance workers to dispose of while we were sent to prison.

When the LAPD finally began arresting those of us interlocked around the symbolic tent, we were all ordered by the LAPD to unlink from each other (in order to facilitate the arrests). Each seated, nonviolent protester beside me who refused to cooperate by unlinking his arms had the following done to him: an LAPD officer would forcibly extend the protestor’s legs, grab his left foot, twist it all the way around and then stomp his boot on the insole, pinning the protestor’s left foot to the pavement, twisted backwards. Then the LAPD officer would grab the protestor’s right foot and twist it all the way the other direction until the non-violent protestor, in incredible agony, would shriek in pain and unlink from his neighbor.

It was horrible to watch, and apparently designed to terrorize the rest of us. At least I was sufficiently terrorized. I unlinked my arms voluntarily and informed the LAPD officers that I would go peacefully and cooperatively. I stood as instructed, and then I had my arms wrenched behind my back, and an officer hyperextended my wrists into my inner arms. It was super violent, it hurt really really bad, and he was doing it on purpose. When I involuntarily recoiled from the pain, the LAPD officer threw me face-first to the pavement. He had my hands behind my back, so I landed right on my face. The officer dropped with his knee on my back and ground my face into the pavement. It really, really hurt and my face started bleeding and I was very scared. I begged for mercy and I promised that I was honestly not resisting and would not resist.

My hands were then zipcuffed very tightly behind my back, where they turned blue. I am now suffering nerve damage in my right thumb and palm.

I was put on a paddywagon with other nonviolent protestors and taken to a parking garage in Parker Center. They forced us to kneel on the hard pavement of that parking garage for seven straight hours with our hands still tightly zipcuffed behind our backs. Some began to pass out. One man rolled to the ground and vomited for a long, long time before falling unconscious. The LAPD officers watched and did nothing.

At 9 a.m. we were finally taken from the pavement into the station to be processed. The charge was sitting in the park after the police said not to. It’s a misdemeanor. Almost always, for a misdemeanor, the police just give you a ticket and let you go. It costs you a couple hundred dollars. Apparently, that’s what happened with most every other misdemeanor arrest in LA that day.

With us Occupy LA protestors, however, they set bail at $5,000 and booked us into jail. Almost none of the protesters could afford to bail themselves out. I’m lucky and I could afford it, except the LAPD spent all day refusing to actually *accept* the bail they set. If you were an accused murderer or a rapist in LAPD custody that day, you could bail yourself right out and be back on the street, no problem. But if you were a nonviolent Occupy LA protestor with bail money in hand, you were held long into the following morning, with absolutely no access to a lawyer.

I spent most of my day and night crammed into an eight-man jail cell, along with sixteen other Occupy LA protesters. My sleeping spot was on the floor next to the toilet.

Finally, at 2:30 the next morning, after twenty-five hours in custody, I was released on bail. But there were at least 200 Occupy LA protestors who couldn’t afford the bail. The LAPD chose to keep those peaceful, non-violent protesters in prison for two full days… the absolute legal maximum that the LAPD is allowed to detain someone on misdemeanor charges.

As a reminder, Antonio Villaraigosa has referred to all of this as “the LAPD’s finest hour.”

So that’s what happened to the 292 women and men were arrested last Wednesday. Now let’s talk about a man who was not arrested last Wednesday. He is former Citigroup CEO Charles Prince. Under Charles Prince, Citigroup was guilty of massive, coordinated securities fraud.

Citigroup spent years intentionally buying up every bad mortgage loan it could find, creating bad securities out of those bad loans and then selling shares in those bad securities to duped investors. And then they sometimes secretly bet *against* their *own* bad securities to make even more money. For one such bad Citigroup security, Citigroup executives were internally calling it, quote, “a collection of dogshit”. To investors, however, they called it, quote, “an attractive investment rigorously selected by an independent investment adviser”.

This is fraud, and it’s a felony, and the Charles Princes of the world spent several years doing it again and again: knowingly writing bad mortgages, and then packaging them into fraudulent securities which they then sold to suckers and then repeating the process. This is a big part of why your property values went up so fast. But then the bubble burst, and that’s why our economy is now shattered for a generation, and it’s also why your home is now underwater. Or at least mine is.

Anyway, if your retirement fund lost a decade’s-worth of gains overnight, this is why.

If your son’s middle school has added furlough days because the school district can’t afford to keep its doors open for a full school year, this is why.

If your daughter has come out of college with a degree only to discover that there are no jobs for her, this is why.

But back to Charles Prince. For his four years of in charge of massive, repeated fraud at Citigroup, he received fifty-three million dollars in salary and also received another ninety-four million dollars in stock holdings. What Charles Prince has *not* received is a pair of zipcuffs. The nerves in his thumb are fine. No cop has thrown Charles Prince into the pavement, face-first. Each and every peaceful, nonviolent Occupy LA protester arrested last week has has spent more time sleeping on a jail floor than every single Charles Prince on Wall Street, combined.

The more I think about that, the madder I get. What does it say about our country that nonviolent protesters are given the bottom of a police boot while those who steal hundreds of billions, do trillions worth of damage to our economy and shatter our social fabric for a generation are not only spared the zipcuffs but showered with rewards?

In any event, believe it or not, I’m really not angry that I got arrested. I chose to get arrested. And I’m not even angry that the mayor and the LAPD decided to give non-violent protestors like me a little extra shiv in jail (although I’m not especially grateful for it either).

I’m just really angry that every single Charles Prince wasn’t in jail with me.

Thank you for letting me share that anger with you today.

Patrick Meighan

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[VIDEO] Fox News Blames Liberals For Brainwashing Youth

Are you fucking kidding me?! I highly doubt that the comedian who came up with the idea to make the Muppets Movie (Jason Segel) was attempting to brainwash the youth in America to help raise awareness for the Liberal Political agenda. I mean, that’s as ludicrous as saying that the gay community has a “gay agenda“, one that virtually no gay person I know is aware of.

Also, do you remember the inappropriate jokes from children’s shows that you watched when you were little? No. You remember how great they were and how when you watch them now, you UNDERSTAND so much more than you did when you first watched them.

Either way, explaining away Occupy Wall Street and the entire Occupy Movement on the brainwashing that has been done by Hollywood and Liberals within Hollywood, is absolutely ridiculous. This whole generation does not feel this way because of subliminal messages within the shows they watched as children. Unfortunately, Fox has to make up some sort of excuse for why so many people are involved and not on their side in regards to politics.

Pathetic. Fox News is a joke.

Cover of DVD The Gay Agenda: March on Washington

Image via Wikipedia

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An Infographic Showing Arrests Across The US As A Result Of The Occupy Movement

Below is an inforgraphic that shares how many arrests were made in each city as a result of protesting in the Occupy Movement. It is rather large, so if you click on the image below, you’ll be able to read it much more clearly. Muhammad Saleem from Online MBA shared this infographic with me and I feel I have no choice but to pass it on and share with everyone just how many people have been arrested and/or jailed while fighting for a change in our economy, government, laws, etc.

The Occupy Movement is a coming together of the 99% who have no say in our justice system, economy, government, etc. and to see the sheer amount of people who have been arrested while fighting for our freedoms and a chance to bring America back as a thriving country, is absolutely mind-blowing. Please share this with people and if you’re still confused about what the Occupy Movement is truly about, check out another post:

Understanding The Occupy Movement

Occupy the United States
Via: Online MBA Guide

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[VIDEO] Two Officers Suspended After UC David Pepper-Spraying Incident

Friday Nov. 18th at 4:54 PM officers were caught on video pepper-spraying the peaceful protesters on UC Davis‘ campus after they refused to get out of the way for police.

Shortly after this video was releases, many people from all over had come together to speak out on behalf of the students and against the police who were shown implementing the pepper spray in this video. UC Davis and Chancellor had received negative feedback over this incident and decided they must take action.

In a statement, school Chancellor Linda Katehi announced that the officers were on administrative leave. She also said that she accepted ‘full responsibility’ for Friday’s incident.

Unfortunately, many people had hoped that this announcement would include her resignation, which it did not.

Witnesses watched in horror as police moved in on more than a dozen tents erected in the campus quad drenching demonstrators with the burning yellow spray and arresting 10 people, nine of them students.

Although UC Davis had not named the officers, one of them has been identified locally as Lt John Pike.

In the latest statement Ms Katehi said:  ‘I spoke with students this weekend, and I feel their outrage. ‘I have also heard from an overwhelming number of students, faculty, staff and alumni from around the country.

‘I am deeply saddened that this happened on our campus, and as chancellor, I take full responsibility for the incident.

Holding firm: Linda Katehi, the chancellor of the University of California, Davis on Saturday afternoon called video images of an officer calmly pepper-spraying a line of student protesters a day earlier 'chilling' but said she would not step down.Mea Culpa: Linda Katehi, the chancellor of the University of California, Davis on Sunday accepted full responsibility but did not step down

But despite widespread calls for her resignation, the chancellor still refused to budge.

The statement continued: ‘I pledge to take the actions needed to ensure that this does not happen again.’

‘I feel very sorry for the harm our students were subjected to and I vow to work tirelessly to make the campus a more welcoming and safe place.’

Katehi said the investigation into the events surrounding the arrests, including communications from the police to the administration had been accelerated with a deadline of 30 days for the task force to issue its report.

The students were showing their support of Occupy Wall Street which has gained recognition all around the world. Their right to protest peacefully was threatened when police took advantage of their strength in being determined to sit there and stand up for what they believed in.

The moving protest was held in support of the overall Occupy Wall Street movement and in solidarity with protesters at the University of California, Berkeley who were jabbed by police with batons on November 9.

The school faculty association had demanded the chancellor’s resignation, saying that her authorisation of police force represented ‘a gross failure of leadership’. 

A statement released by the Davis faculty board said: ‘Given the recent use of excessive force by police against ‘occupy’ protestors at UC Berkeley and elsewhere, the Chancellor must have anticipated that, by authorizing police action, she was effectively authorizing their use of excessive force against peaceful UCD student protestors.

This seems like a rather strong statement. Why would you need police to be prevalent at a unified peaceful protest on your campus? The students were doing nothing wrong and sitting quietly to show they supported their peers at other campuses that had endured the negativity of the police.

Sadly, the pepper spraying incident just adds fuel to the fire and proves that these students are out here for the right reason. They have the right to make their complaints known to those in charge and not persecuted for voicing them. It is wrong for the police to use such brutality when nothing is being done. other than the refusal to move from where they were protesting.

For more information, visit DailyMail Online

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[VIDEO] Retired Police Captain Joins Occupy Movement And Is Arrested

Former Philadelphia police captain Ray Lewis was arrested during the Occupy protests in full uniform. Lewis was fed up with the way his former co-workers were handling the protesters and felt that what they were fighting for was justified. Unfortunately, he, like the protesters, were not viewed in a great light by the police and they decided to take action against their former Captain.

The ex-cop was taking part in the demonstrations in New York when he was detained by fellow officers who put toughened plastic bands around his wrists and shoved him to the floor.

Startling footage posted on YouTube shows his uniform blending in with a dozen other officers – before they grab him and haul him away.

It’s really nice to see people from a different point of view who still agree with the issues at hand. This man didn’t approve of the way that New York was handling the Wall Street Protests and brought a sign to share his disgust with the police’s actions towards these people. He makes very obvious points about why our bickering about dirty parks and traffic due to the amount of people gathering, is utterly ridiculous.

‘They complained about the park being dirty,’ he said.

‘Here they are worrying about dirty parks when people are starving to death, where people are freezing, where people are sleeping in subways and they’re concerned about a dirty park.

‘That’s obnoxious, it’s arrogant, it’s ignorant, it’s disgusting.’

Lewis was just one of the 300 hundred people who were arrested on November 17th, the ‘Day of Action’. The reason for this particular protest was because people didn’t agree with the way New York mayor Michael Bloomberg was handling the situation.

Mr Lewis lambasted his fellow officers as being ‘workers for the 1 per cent and they don’t even realise it’, a reference to what the protesters claim are the few who run the U.S.

He also attacked the harsh tactics of the NYPD as unacceptable and said that they had to end.

Speaking after the Day of Action, he said: ‘You should, by law, only use force to protect someone’s life or to protect them from being bodily injured.

‘If you’re not protecting somebody’s life or protecting them from bodily injury, there’s no need to use force. 

‘And the number one thing that they always have in their favor that they seldom use is negotiation – continue to talk, and talk and talk to people. 

‘You have nothing to lose by that. This bullrush – what happened last night is totally uncalled for when they did not use negotiation long enough.’

 

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[VIDEO] Occupy Cal Berkeley 11/9/11

Many students at Cal State University Berkeley were protesting and faced some brutality coming from the police which was, in my opinion, uncalled for. The administration on campus had said it would not tolerate these protests which led to the police even being involved in the first place. Having a campus like Berkeley not allow its students to protest in regards to issues they feel strongly about seems rather unethical.

The encampment, approved in a nearly unanimous general assembly vote by the protest’s participants, was formed to show solidarity with the national Occupy movement but focused on the increased privatization of the UC system, according to Amanda Armstrong, a UC Berkeley head steward for UAW Local 2865 — a union representing graduate student instructors — and organizer of the event.

This movement is not going to just end because the police are acting defensively, in fact, this is giving those protesters ammunition to keep fighting for their right and freedoms as citizens of the United States Of America. We live her and appreciate our freedoms, but we also have the right to speak up and have our voices heard when we don’t agree with the economical and political decisions being made by those in charge.

Sadly there were arrests in Berkeley, but this doesn’t come as a shock. Hopefully fewer people are hurt and more changes are made so we stop seeing our peers being jailed and injured because they want change in our country.

SOURCE

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Occupy Wall Street Infographic That Charts The Beginnings Of The Movement

Occupy Wall Street
Via: Online MBA Experts

[VIDEO] ‘Occupy Wall Street Anthem’: A video of images paired with a wonderful song

This video was sent to me by someone who felt strongly about me posting this on my site. I must agree that it has some very compelling images that show some of the truths of people who are struggling during this time of trying to make a change.

Allison Gray, the singer-songwriter, who can be heard in this video. She is also very involved in the Occupy LA protests and decided to compile a bunch of images from Occupy NY, LA and her home town of Seattle, because she felt inclined to try and capture the intensity of what the 99% are out there doing.

Enjoy!

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Funny Signs For Occupy Wall Street

Here are some of the wonderful signs that were made by Occupy Wall Street Protesters.

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[VIDEO] Marine Veteran Wounded With Rubber Bullet During The Raid On Occupy Oakland

The police decided (were told they had to remove the protesters) to go up against the brave men and women who were Occupying Oakland last night October 25th, 2011. They used tear gas and rubber bullets to clear the tent city that was full of Americans protesting Capitalism and the control that corporations have on all of us.

Officers had cleared the site of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators around 12 hours earlier in a dawn raid where at least 85 people were arrested.

Police gave repeated warnings to demonstrators to disperse from the entrance to Frank Ogawa Plaza in the Californian city before firing tear gas canisters into the crowd at 7:45pm on Tuesday evening.

While they were doing their job, their job is being controlled by the people these very citizens are protesting. The more you remove them and fight their peaceful protest, the more you are implying that what these people are doing is right. Hundreds, thousands, hell, millions, have come together to make a change to our government because the current system in place is not working. Many of us are suffering, unemployed, in debt, and unable to fix our problems while the 1% gains currency that is unimaginable to most American citizens.

Marine Veteran Scott Olsen, a Veterans for Peace member is the gentleman who is seen in the video bleeding from the head after being hit with a non-lethal bullet. This man was employed by and fought for this country, but is now being attacked by the men and women who he devoted his life for. He is dealing with a war in his own country and HE is seen as the enemy.

Instead of throwing tear gas or rubber bullets at the police dressed head to toe in riot gear, the protesters were armed with paint. The paint was thrown on officers to show their resistance to leaving the are that they had occupied in the hopes of protesting peacefully.

The number of protesters diminished with each round of tear gas. Police estimated that there were roughly 1,000 demonstrators at the first clash following the march. 

About 200 remained after the final conflict around 11:15pm on Tuesday night – mostly young adults, some riding bicycles, protecting themselves from the noxious fumes with bandanas and scarves wrapped around their faces.

‘This movement is more than just the people versus the police,’ Mario Fernandez said on Tuesday night. ‘It’s about the people trying to have their rights to basic services. This crowd isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.’

City officials said that two officers were injured. At least five protesters were arrested and several others injured in the evening clashes. But city officials said 97 people were arrested in the Tuesday morning raid on the camp.

SOURCE AND MORE INFORMATION

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