Tag Archives: hugged

Christian Group Shows Up To Chicago Gay Pride Holding Apologetic Signs

UPDATED: Wednesday, March 27th @ 2:45pm – I don’t have anything more to add in regards to the story below, but I would liek to share a little bit about how I feel with the Supreme Court currently debating same-sex marriage. Being a lesbian, this is a pivotal time in history and I would like to see us receive the right to do what we want with whomever we want, because it in no way affects anyone but us. We are not benefiting from the institutions in place for legally married couples, and that is absolutely unfair and should not be legal in this country who constantly shares how “free” we are. In a showing of my support, I made this photo and would love for anyone and everyone to share :) The link to my FaceBook (where it can be easily shared) is HERE

"When I was a little girl and learnt about the Civil Rights Movement, I never thought I would one day be witnessing history that is seemingly so parallel. Along with it being historical for America, it's historical for me, personally. I hope that the court makes the decision to allow free thinking individuals the opportunity to love whomever they choose and be a better example to younger generations. I am incredibly proud of who I am, but more than that, I am proud to love one of the most amazingly witty, honest, dedicated people in this world... and she happens to be a beautiful woman. My hope, in regards to the outcome of this decision, is that my wedding day is one where we legally are bound together in addition to a celebration with all of our supportive friends and family :) ♥ NOH8"

“When I was a little girl and learnt about the Civil Rights Movement, I never thought I would one day be witnessing history that is seemingly so parallel. Along with it being historical for America, it’s historical for me, personally. I hope that the court makes the decision to allow free thinking individuals the opportunity to love whomever they choose and be a better example to younger generations. I am incredibly proud of who I am, but more than that, I am proud to love one of the most amazingly witty, honest, dedicated people in this world… and she happens to be a beautiful woman. My hope, in regards to the outcome of this decision, is that my wedding day is one where we legally are bound together in addition to a celebration with all of our supportive friends and family :) ♥ NOH8″

This is an amazing photo that captured the moment a gay man hugged a member of a Christian group, that came to Gay Pride to apologize for the way the church has treated homosexuals. It’s nice to see people of faith have common sense enough to know that hate and prejudice is wrong. A step in the right direction towards equality and something everyone should learn from. THIS is the kind of compassion that religion teaches, but far too often doesn’t follow. Well done.

Since seeing this photo, a friend of mine had introduced me to more of the story. A man, by the name of Nathan, is the one you see above hugging the gay guy in his underwear, or Tristan rather. Well, Nathan wrote a blog about this day and this moment and what his and his fellow church-goers had done. Here is what he had to say:

I hugged a man in his underwear. I think Jesus would have too.

I spent the day at Chicago’s Pride Parade. Some friends and I, with The Marin Foundation, wore shirts with “I’m Sorry” written on it. We had signs that said, “I’m sorry that Christians judge you,” “I’m sorry the way churches have treated you,” “I used to be a bible-banging homophobe, sorry.” We wanted to be an alternative Christian voice from the protestors that were there speaking hate into megaphones. 

What I loved most about the day is when people “got it.” I loved watching people’s faces as they saw our shirts, read the signs, and looked back at us. Responses were incredible. Some people blew us kisses, some hugged us, some screamed thank you. A couple ladies walked up and said we were the best thing they had seen all day. I wish I had counted how many people hugged me. One guy in particular softly said, “Well, I forgive you.” 

Watching people recognize our apology brought me to tears many times. It was reconciliation personified. 

My favorite though was a gentleman who was dancing on a float. He was dressed solely in white underwear and had a pack of abs like no one else. As he was dancing on the float, he noticed us and jokingly yelled, “What are you sorry for? It’s pride!” I pointed to our signs and watched him read them. 

Then it clicked. 

Then he got it. 

He stopped dancing. He looked at all of us standing there. A look of utter seriousness came across his face. And as the float passed us he jumped off of it and ran towards us. In all his sweaty beautiful abs of steal, he hugged me and whispered, “thank you.” 

Before I had even let go, another guy ran up to me, kissed me on the cheek, and gave me the biggest bear hug ever. I almost had the wind knocked out of me; it was one of those hugs. 

This is why I do what I do. This is why I will continue to do what I do. Reconciliation was personified. 

I think a lot of people would stop at the whole “man in his underwear dancing” part. That seems to be the most controversial. It’s what makes the evening news. It’s the stereotype most people have in their minds about Pride.

Sadly, most Christians want to run from such a sight rather than engage it. Most Christian won’t even learn if that person dancing in his underwear has a name. Well, he does. His name is Tristan. 

However, I think Jesus would have hugged him too. It’s exactly what I read throughout scripture: Jesus hanging out with people that religious people would flee from. Correlation between then and now? I think so. 

Acceptance is one thing. Reconciliation is another. Sure at Pride, everyone is accepted (except perhaps the protestors). There are churches that say they accept all. There are business that say the accept everyone. But acceptance isn’t enough. Reconciliation is. 

But there isn’t always reconciliation. And when there isn’t reconciliation, there isn’t full acceptance. Reconciliation is more painful; it’s more difficult. Reconciliation forces one to remember the wrongs committed and relive constant pain. Yet it’s more powerful and transformational because two parties that should not be together and have every right to hate one another come together for the good of one another, for forgiveness, reconciliation, unity.

What I saw and experienced at Pride 2010 was the beginning of reconciliation. It was in the shocked faces of gay men and women who did not ever think Christians would apologize to them.

What I saw and experienced at Pride 2010 was the personification of reconciliation. It was in the hugs and kisses I received, in the “thank you’s” and waves, in the smiles and kisses blown.

I hugged a man in his underwear. I hugged him tightly. And I am proud.

THIS is truly heart-warming. I am crying as I write this because I am proud of this man and his willingness to share what he believes, despite the criticism he may receive. After this, even more came together to keep this story going. Someone had recognized Tristan from the photo, and Tristan got in touch with Nathan. These two shared how this moment meant so much for each of them, and that is what’s remarkable. One person meets another, and for each of them, this was a lasting experience and memory.

To read the interview that nathan did with Tristan, visit Nathan’s blog HERE

All of the photos above were taken by photographer, Michelle, whose work can be seen HERE. She can also be reached in the following ways:

Address Jupiter, FL 33458
United States
Daytime phone 630-730-6090
E-mail loonachic@gmail.com
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